Posts from the ‘shrimp’ Category

Fishy fishy

I was actually in the mood to cook Friday (yay fall!), but couldn’t decide what to make. The two suggestions I received were “fish” or “rustic.” I, however, was in the mood for soup. SO… I found a rustic fish soup recipe to completely bastardize. Everyone wins!

The original recipe is from Cooking Light and besides having some ingredients I wasn’t crazy about (yes celery, I’m talking about you), it also had no spices. None. Not even salt and pepper. Bland much? It also had plain crushed tomatoes. Since spices add zero calories, I was more than a little confused. Oh well. At least it gave me a blank slate to work with.

Rustic Fish Stew

  • 1  tablespoon  olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2  cups  chopped onion
  • 2 diced bell peppers (I used one red and one green. Festive)
  • 3  garlic cloves, minced
  • 4  cups chicken broth
  • 2  cups cubed peeled Yukon gold or red potato
  • 1  cup dry white wine
  • 1/2  cup  chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1  can Mexican Rotel with lime and cilantro
  • 1/2 can Chunky Rotel
  • 1  pound tilapia, cut into bite-size pieces
  • 1/2  pound  peeled and deveined shrimp
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon chili powder
  • garlic salt, salt, and pepper to taste
  • Lime wedges
  • 1 avocado, diced

Heat oil and butter in a large soup pot over medium-high heat. Add onion, peppers, and garlic to pot, ; sauté 5 minutes or until tender. Stir in broth, potato, wine, cilantro, spices, and tomatoes; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 30 minutes or until potato is tender. At this point, I pulled out my beloved immersion blender. This step could be left out, and how much you blend is up to you. I left some chunks in, but liked how it made the soup more of a chowder once it was broken up a bit. Add fish and shrimp; cook an additional 5 minutes or until fish and shrimp are done. Serve with avocado and lime wedges.

This was really good. Spicy, fresh, and completely out of the ordinary. Sounds a lot like me, actually.

Success!

 

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Shrimp and Grits

I thought about titling this post “The South will rise again, and flood the nation with heavy cream” but decided to go for a more simple, and less confusing, name.
These were unbelievably good. Seriously. I licked my plate. As did everyone else who ate them. Sweet sister Rainer and I found the base recipe online, and then of course I had to mix it all up. The result was a winner, for sure.

Shrimp and Grits

– 4 servings cooked grits (add 1/4 cup Velveeta and 3 Tbsp. cream from dish)
– 3 Tbsp. olive oil
– 1 1/2 cups pre-cooked cubed ham (add to that 1/2 Tbsp. Tony’s seasoning)
– 1 cup diced leeks
– 3 Tbsp. diced onions
– 4 Tbsp. diced green peppers
– 20-30 large shrimp (peeled and de-veined)
– 5 Tbsp. white wine
– 2 cups heavy cream
– salt and pepper
Cook grits according to directions; add velveeta and set aside and keep warm. Heat oil in a large pot or dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add ham and seasoning and saute until crisp. Add diced vegetables and saute until onions are translucent. Add shrimp and saute for 30-45 seconds or until pink. Remove from the pan and set aside. Turn heat up slightly and wait for the pan to start smoking slightly. Deglaze the pan with a white wine. Slowly add the cream and let reduce until thickened. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Take 3 Tbsp of the cream sauce and stir it into the prepared grits. Pour shrimp mixture back into large pot and stir to combine. To serve place grits on plate and spoon shrimp mixture over it. The sauce will soak through the grits and pool on the plate. Inhale.
Now go run a mile. I didn’t, but it would probably be a good idea.

House Party!

Well, La and I made the big move. Downstairs. Whew. Who knew that making approximately 200 billion trips up and down a flight of stairs could be so exhausting?!
In honor of the move, we had a few girls over for dinner, mainly so that I could officially break in our (still) tiny kitchen.
The original recipe is here, and yes, I know it’s another one from PW, BUT it’s actually from a guest blogger! So… yay! Variety!

Spicy Orange Garlic Shrimp

24 pieces (26-30 per pound) deveined shrimp
2 cloves (to 4 Cloves) garlic
3/4 cups orange juice (I use Simply Orange, because it’s simply the best! Better than all the rest…)
1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon Old Bay Seasoning
3 Tablespoons salted butter, divided
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon sugar
 
Thaw and peel the shrimp (I actually used fresh). 
Thinly slice your garlic cloves. Add the garlic to ¾ cup of orange juice.  Measure out and add all of the spices to the orange juice as well.
Okay, confession time: the original recipe didn’t have cinnamon or sugar in it. The reason this changed is because, well, I wasn’t paying attention, and grabbed my bottle of what I thought was cayenne pepper, but turned out to be cinnamon. Oops. Luckily I realized this before I had stirred it all up, so I was able to scoop most of the cinnamon back out, but I thought that a little bit wouldn’t hurt. I was right. I love what the cinnamon brought to the sauce. Feel free to leave it out though. I also threw the sugar in because it just seemed the thing to do.
In a large skillet over high heat melt 2 tablespoons butter. Once butter has melted add your shrimp. Cook them for about 30-60 seconds and begin flipping them over starting with the ones you placed in the pan first so they don’t get overdone. Cook for another 30-60 seconds. Remove the cooked shrimp from the pan, leaving the heat on high.
Once the butter and drippings begin to smoke ever so slightly add the spicy orange garlic mixture to the pan and give it a good stir. Add the last tablespoon of butter to the sauce and after a few minutes of cooking and occasional stirring your sauce should be slightly thicker.
Return the shrimp to the pan and give them a nice toss to coat them in the sauce for just a few seconds, then pour into a serving dish.

I wound up making extra sauce and serving the shrimp over wild rice, and it was delicious. We had it with our favorite salad and some white sangria. Perfect way to grace a new home.